Seedy Saturday Picton Feb 23, 2013

In the midst of a wonderful January thaw and surrounded by new seed catalogues, a gardener’s fancy soon turns to the planting and growing season ahead. Well, okay, honestly, I have not finished the clean up in the garden and organizing of seed labels from last year. However, I boldly and with much excitement, look forward to another great adventure in the garden in 2013. What shall I plant that is new, what are my tried and true that deserve a place of honour in my plot?

Nothing signals the start of the planting season quite like a trip to our local Seedy Saturday event at the end of February. Part seed exchange, part seed shopping trip, part information gathering and part social event, Seedy Saturday is a non-profit, volunteer organized community event. 2013 marks our 4th annual event and once again I’m delighted to be part of the organizing committee.

 Wooden Basket Bounty

What will you find at Seedy Saturday?

SEED VENDORS – We have several local sellers of organic and sustainably raised heirloom seeds so you can purchase what you need for the growing season; from vegetables to flowers to herbs

A large SEED EXCHANGE TABLE – bring seeds that are excess to your needs and pick up something from the table you would like to try. Don’t have seeds to swap – no problem, pick up something from the table and if you can, make a small donation to our honour box. We want to make it easy and fun for you to grow in your own garden.

INFORMATION GALORE  from how to save seeds, how to grow successfully, how to start that first garden, edible flowers, composting, growing in containers – if it’s garden related, we will be able to answer your questions

INFORMAL DISCUSSIONS about seed saving with a number of knowledgeable seed savers. There is pride in being able to save your own seed and preserve your garden’s diversity.

BOOK TABLE – this will feature donated books on a wide range of garden topics all available for a donation of your choosing.

CANTEEN with yummy food for a modest price

RAFFLE BASKETS to bid on with wonderful garden related and/or local food treasures

You will also find a relaxed and friendly atmosphere, familiar faces and new friends, all designed to make this a wonderful start to the growing season.

Well, now that you are excited I’m sure you are asking When and Where is this wonderful event being held?

10 a.m. to 3 p.m. – Saturday, February 23, 2013
St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, 31 King Street, Picton, Ontario
If you are not in the Picton area, check out the Seeds of Diversity website to find an event in your area. Seeds of Diversity is a non-profit organization devoted to protecting the seed heritage of Canada (and the world).
http://www.seeds.ca

 Basil Seedlings  

I’m sure you have some questions you really want to ask so we sat down with one of this year’s exhibitors, Amanda from Green Hill Greens and asked her a few questions.

Why should I bother saving my own seed?
If you enjoy growing plants from seed, then saving seed from plants you’ve grown is the next logical step for many gardeners. It’s the way that people have grown and improved plants for thousands of years and it puts the power of food production into your own hands.

What makes heirloom seeds better than the ones I can buy at the garden center?
Heirloom seeds represent generations of work by gardeners who have nurtured varieties for particular traits. Seeds saved from heirloom plants can be used to grow the same variety next year: you can’t do this with commercially-produced hybrid seeds. Getting heirloom seeds from local growers means that you can be sure you’re getting seeds from plants that do
well in our area.

What’s the best edible flower for the home garden?
Squash flowers can be used in a number of ways: stuffed with herbs and cream cheese and fried in butter, for example, or simply torn and used raw in salads.

I only have a barrel to grow in, what can I plant?
Many herbs and vegetables grow well in small containers: lettuces, carrots and beets are definitely worth trying. Peppers are good too, and you can also sow a few edible flowers like nasturtiums for an attractive display.

Thanks Amanda.  Have questions like this, come and get your answers.

Pink Poppy

Next Post – I’m naming names!

Save The Date – February 23, 2013 10am-3pm

See You There

Seedy Saturday

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